LearnZillion Math Webinar Archive

This page is updated with our webinars focused on implementing the Common Core math standards — be sure to create a free account on LearnZillion to receive invitations to future events.

 

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Using the EQuIP Rubric: Math

Recorded 03/18/14 5:00pm EST Ensure your math resources are Common Core aligned. (All grades)

 

 

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An Introduction to the EQuIP Rubric

Recorded 03/13/14 5:00pm EST Learn how to identify high quality materials aligned to the Common Core. (All grades)

 

 

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How Principals Can Relieve Anxiety Around Common Core Implementation

Recorded 3/4/14 3:00pm EST Help your teachers implement the Common Core (All grades; Administrators)

 

 

Thumbnail.Practicaltipsforusinglessonplans.Webinar.2014Practical tips for using LearnZillion’s Math Lesson Plans in the classroom

Recorded 2/27/14 6:00pm EST Learn how to use LearnZillion’s Math Lesson Plans in your classroom. (Grades 3-8)

 

 

Thumbnail.Streamlineprofessionaldevelopment.Webinar.2014Save time, reduce stress. Streamline planning and supercharge your professional growth with LearnZillion.

Recorded 2/30/14 3:30pm EST Learn how to integrate LearnZillion into your lesson planning process. (All grades)

 

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Learn how LearnZillion Lesson Plans can help you ensure students master the essential math standards

Recorded 2/12/14 5:00pm EST Ensure that your students master the essential math standards. (Grades 3-8)

 

thumbnail.BackmappingSkip.Webinar.2013Back-mapping from PARCC and SBAC items to Formative Assessments

Recorded 1/8/14 2:00pm EST Prepare for Common Core math formative assessments. (All grades)

 

 

Ready for more? Click the button below to view our ELA webinars:

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Using the EQuIP Rubric: Math

Ensure your math resources are Common Core aligned.

The EQuIP Rubric  (Educators Evaluating the Quality of Instructional Product) for mathematics (download here) is a tool developed by state education leaders with support from Achieve to help teachers and principals identify high-quality materials aligned to the Common Core State Standards.

In this webinar, we sat down with Mimi Alkire, a mathematics consultant and collaborator with Achieve, to explore in-depth the components of the EQuIP rubric for Mathematics and how to use the rubric to guide lesson and unit planning.

Download the webinar slides here

Access the full suite of EQuIP resources

 

Want more context? Be sure to check out our Introduction to the EQuIP rubric webinar to get background context on why and how the rubric was developed.

 

An Introduction to the EQuIP Rubric

Learn how to identify high quality materials aligned to the Common Core – Webinar (3/13/14)

Learn more about the EQuIP (Educators Evaluating the Quality of Instructional Product) Rubric for mathematics and ELA/literacy grades k-2 and 3-12, a tool developed by state education leaders with support from Achieve to help teachers and principals identify high-quality materials aligned to the Common Core State Standards.

LearnZillion’s Director of Professional Learning and Community, Posie Wood, interviewed Alissa Peltzman of Achieve about the development of the rubric, how teachers use it to improve their practice and transition to the Common Core and the resources available to help teachers do this.

Download the webinar slides here

Access the full suite of EQuIP resources

Click below to view an EQuIP rubric tutorial:

Using the ELA Rubric          Using the Math Rubric

         Tues 3/18 5:00-5:45pm EST                  Wed 3/18 8:00-8:45pm EST

  Ensure your ELA lessons are CCSS Aligned        Ensure your math Lessons Are CCSS aligned

My First Year Teaching: Discovering the Magic of Watching Great Teachers Work

Boaz Munro, former 3rd grade teacher

Boaz Munro, former 1st grade teacher

My first day teaching on my own came about two weeks into the school year.   I worked at an elementary charter school that devoted the beginning of the year almost entirely to promoting an orderly yet joyful school culture.  My first several days in the classroom, therefore, were spent supporting my more experienced co-teacher as she led activities and games to prepare our kids to be diligent scholars and responsible citizens.

By the end of this initial period, I felt much less nervous than I had on the first day of the year.  I had bonded in small ways with my students, met their parents, and even led some brief activities in front of the class under my co-teacher’s supervision.  I was cautiously confident about being a teacher.

A Confident Start

During those first few weeks, we had assessed each student’s reading level and organized them into leveled guided reading groups named for the planets in the solar system.  I was in charge of Uranus—10 students at a small, crescent-shaped table—until the next assessment six weeks later.  I had planned the next six weeks carefully, organizing my library, downloading resources, and studying research on reading comprehension.

And now the day had come.  I had a hand-drawn visual anchor up on my easel, a fresh container of sharpened pencils, and placed a shiny book in front of each little seat.  I expected the students to file in and sit down respectfully, hands folded, eyes on me.  And that’s exactly what happened.

A Humbling Realization

Just kidding.  That first class quickly fell apart, as would many others.  As anyone who has ever taught knows, and as my colleagues Posie Wood and Alix Guerrier have vividly related in their own stories, the first year of teaching is one of the most humbling experiences a person can have. I spent hours preparing for each day’s class, and was still not moving my students nearly far enough.  My students’ reading levels were not increasing as quickly as those of their schoolmates.

Looking back, it’s easy to see why.  So often, I taught my students skills or standards I had never seen anyone teach before.  All of the lessons I planned started with an “I-do”—a modeling of the skill I was trying to teach—and yet I was not watching enough people model the skills I was trying to learn.

A Hope for Support

The times when I improved the most were the times when I stopped toiling alone for a moment and learned from mentors around me.  Occasionally my coach would cover a class so I could observe my co-teacher explaining a difficult concept, or I would sit with the academic dean and we would plan a lesson together.  Just like my students, I learned best by watching talented people work.  This simple realization improved my teaching significantly.  The well-known “beg, borrow, and steal” mantra described by my colleague Lisa Bernstein in a recent post is apt, but I would add a fourth verb: watch.  Watching great teachers work, by sitting next to them to plan or observing their instruction, was unquestionably the single best thing I did to improve my teaching practice during my time in the classroom.  

But there were obstacles to watching these great teachers as much as I wanted to.  I had my own students to look after, and they had theirs; I could only visit other classrooms occasionally.    

Technology has removed these obstacles.  Watching great teachers work is exactly what LearnZillion enables us to do—every day.  Each LearnZillion video is created by an exceptional teacher from around the country, with support from academic coaches, LearnZillion media experts, and peers. These teachers have watched and worked with the best.   They have struggled with the question how best to teach the same standards millions of teachers are adjusting to, and the results of their work are available for old and new teachers to learn from.

Watching the lessons on LearnZillion is like standing in back of a great teacher’s classroom—you’ll see concepts your kids need to learn a new way.  Most likely, you’ll customize or improve on what you see.  As we grow as teachers, our students benefit.

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Save time, reduce stress. Streamline planning and supercharge your professional growth with LearnZillion.

Learn how to integrate LearnZillion into your lesson planning process.

In this webinar we talked with Nick Pyzik, elementary school teacher and coach at Tuscarora Elementary School in Ballenger Creek, Maryland. Watch this recording to get Nick’s tips for using LearnZillion to streamline planning and developing classroom practice.

Here are some highlights:

(3:29) – Using one LearnZillion video as a basis for an entire class period of instruction.

(7:41) – Using the “Common Misunderstanding” part of the video lessons to engage student discussion.

(10:32) – Using guided practice and extension activities as a basis for in-class practice.

(12:00) – Personalizing and customizing LearnZillion’d downloadable powerpoint slides to create practice worksheets. Learn how you can do the same in this post: 5 ways to leverage LearnZillion’s Downloadable Slides 

(17:40) How planning and curriculum development can be imbedded in one’s own professional development.

(20:30) Using LearnZillion as a k-5 coach to help teachers transition to the Common Core.

(22:38) Using the LearnZillion math Lesson Plan resources to help teachers do all the planning components mentioned above and differentiate instruction. To learn more about lesson plans, check out this description, and this webinar recording about practical tips for using Lesson Plans.

(26:30) An invitation to viewers to share additional ideas about how they are using LearnZillion. Please email your ideas to feedback@learnzillion.com!

Save time and streamline your planning with LearnZillion Lesson Plans

Hear from LearnZillion’s own Eric Westendorf (CEO) and Boaz Munro (Content Lead) about how the site’s newest feature can help math teachers ensure their students master the essential standards across grades 3-8.

3 Steps to Understanding Your Common Core Math Standard

Whether you’ve been teaching math for three months or three decades, you likely have a few questions about what the Common Core means for you. How are the new standards different from the standards you used to teach? How closely do they align with your current lessons and units? How will your colleagues at higher and lower grade levels be adjusting their instruction, and what does that mean for you? And, perhaps most importantly, what do you need to know about the Common Core’s take on the standard you’re teaching next week?

We have done a lot of work around these questions at LearnZillion, and the following three steps are our recommended best practices for understanding your Common Core Mathematics standard.

LearnZillion's tips on how to understand your Common Core Math standard

Read on for LearnZillion’s best tips on understanding your Common Core Math standard

Step 1. Do standards analysis research

Analysis of Common Core standards can come in many different forms. Assessment is an important one. The Common Core assessment consortia, PARCC and SBAC, have released annotated sample items that show what students who have mastered specific standards are be able to do.

Many other sites also give helpful resources to anchor your planning. Formative assessments and performance tasks from sources like Illustrative Mathematics and Student Achievement Partners can help you set a vision for the end of a unit or lesson. These resources are generally tagged to Common Core standards, including the Standards for Mathematical Practice.

Step 2. Learn from your peers

Remember – you are not alone! Thousands of other teachers across the country are puzzling over the same standard as you, and – whether in your building or online – many are eager to collaborate.

Set aside time with your grade level team, or colleagues from your district. Form a lesson study group. Observe each other in action. Divide the task of interpreting the standards and bounce ideas and questions off each other.

If you’re looking for free examples of lessons by teachers who have studied the standards, LearnZillion.com is a great resource. We offer a growing library of thousands of free math video lessons and resources for grades 2-12 that have been created by our Dream Team of practicing teachers.

Step 3. Understand your lesson in the context of a bigger picture

If a standard seems confusing, you can always take step back to understand how the standard fits in to the broader conceptual developments taking place in your students’ math journey.  The Progressions, created by a team at the University of Arizona, is a concise and well-written guide to the conceptual developments that students experience as they advance in math.  The Progressions are organized into grade bands and Common Core domains, making it easy to see how your standard rests on earlier standards and reinforces later ones.

Ready to get started?

Let us know how it goes!

Check out this inspirational video on how one teacher felt empowered by this research process.